treize64 (treize64) wrote,
treize64
treize64

Link Salad, the East Asia Edition

-- The Redemption Of Figure Skater Mirai Nagasu - Dvora Meyers, Deadspin, Jan. 4, 2018

"After all, Nagasu hadn’t done anything wrong in 2014. Her “mistake” wasn’t even a mistake—she simply over-performed after a few years of underperforming, and came on strong a little too late in the Olympic cycle. In a subjectively judged sport like skating, skating cleanly is as important as having the reputation for skating cleanly. When you make mistakes in successive competitions, it can become harder to extract the points from the judges. A skater has to create an expectation of success in order to be successful. Nagasu hadn’t done quite enough hitting in the years leading up to Sochi to create that expectation, at least compared to Wagner and 2014 national champion Gracie Gold."

-- Uchi - Kazuo Ishiguro, London Review of Books, Aug. 1, 1985

"There is no doubt that at times Morley goes too far in applying his uchi-theory, and his insistence on it often prevents him exploring other lines of relevant thought. It seems odd to discuss Japanese ethics without giving space to the influence of Bushido, the samurai ethical code, which arguably has had a greater effect on everyday Japanese behaviour than either of the two main religions, Shintoism and Buddhism. Neither does he ponder the role which the patron-protégé relationship plays at every level of Japanese society, and which has been highlighted by many, including the Japanese anthropologist Chie Nakane, as crucial to the understanding of what is peculiarly Japanese about the Japanese. There is a tendency to assume that anything non-European about Japanese culture must be uniquely Japanese. Behind this seems to lie the sadly familiar presumption that white European (or European-based) cultures comprise world culture. I would be happier with his suggestion that the Japanese are peculiarly obsessed with the idea of uchi if I were satisfied that it was not equally dominant in, say, Arab, African or Indian societies. In fact, it is not impossible that it is Western European culture which is distinct from the rest of the world in having a peculiarly diffused sense of uchi. Then again, the concept, as defined here, standing as it can for one’s family or for the whole of Japan, remains hazy. A view of behaviour which cannot clearly distinguish between the next-door neighbour and a foreigner is in danger of grossly simplifying the Japanese attitude towards different kinds of outsider."

-- Han Kang and the Complexity of Translation - Jiayang Fan, The New Yorker, Jan. 15, 2018

"In an essay about translating “Human Acts,” published in the online magazine Asymptote, Deborah Smith describes reading Han’s work and being “arrested by razor-sharp images which arise from the text without being directly described there.” She quotes a couple of her “very occasional interpolations,” including the striking phrase “sad flames licking up against a smooth wall of glass.” Charse Yun, in his essay about “The Vegetarian,” declares his admiration for Smith’s work but argues that it is a “new creation.” Smith insists that the phrases she added are images “so powerfully evoked by the Korean that I sometimes find myself searching the original text in vain, convinced that they were in there somewhere, as vividly explicit as they are in my head.”"
Tags: books, east asia, japan, korea, link salad, literature, longform, non-fiction, sportswriting, writing
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